Innovators: Oceans Blog - OA Posts

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HARNESSING THE MOTION OF WAVES

by admin on January 26, 2015

Having grown up in coastal Newfoundland,  Daniel Hoyles has seen, heard and felt first hand the power of the ocean. Now the ambitious Memorial University bachelor of commerce alumnus and chief operating officer of Grey Island Energy is developing a technology to harness the ocean’s immense wave energy to power everything from a house along the coast to a massive offshore oil rig. Read more.

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NEW APPLICATIONS FOR DOPPLER PROFILERS

by admin on January 25, 2015

As more countries consider alternative, renewable sources for energy, the need for accurate methods to assess the impacts of these new technologies is growing.Dr. Len Zedel is the associate dean of Science (graduate and research) and a professor in Memorial University of Newfoundland's Department of Physics and Physical Oceanography.   Read more.

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REVERSE-ENGINEERING THE OCEAN

by admin on January 14, 2015

A soft-spoken man with a ready wit and a love of practical science, Dr. Michael Graham is the son of an Anglican priest and a nun. The story of how this man with a PhD in the process of water movement in corn became the project lead for the Wave Energy Research Centre in Lord’s Cove is anything but a straight line. 
Read more.

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TWO NEW U.S. OCEAN RESEARCH SHIPS TO SET SAIL IN 2015

by admin on January 8, 2015

(Anacortes, Wash.; 05 Jan. 2015) Two new U.S. research ships will take to the seas in the Arctic and Atlantic in 2015, allowing scientists around the world to explore the geology, biology, and health of the oceans.
The U.S. National Science Foundation has commissioned the Arctic research vessel Sikuliaq (pronounced see-KOO-lee-auk), while the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution's (WHOI) ship, dubbed Neil Armstrong, will begin science operations late next year, said ocean researchers. Read more.

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MARINE TECHNOLOGY CLUSTER IMPORTANT FOR MISSISSIPPI’S FUTURE

by admin on January 6, 2015


A new study looking at Mississippi’s maritime industries spotlights the importance of shipbuilding, fishing, oceanography and marine technology as a dominant force in the state’s economy. The data show that in the three coastal counties, about 51,000 people--that is more than one in every three people in the regional workforce--are employed in the blue industries.   And it’s not just the Mississippi Gulf Coast that has a stake in the blue economy.   Read more.